One Day at a Time: Managing Energy and Emotions in Trying Times

mom's gone missingSometimes, when you’re at the starting line as a family caregiver, you may never imagine what challenges, feelings of frustration and sadness lie ahead. But you may also be surprised at the bountiful gifts of love you receive.

The holidays can be especially challenging for caregivers who may feel overwhelmed and burned out from being a primary source of care for loved ones.

The complicated journey that Susan A. Marshall took began and ended with her caring for both parents before they passed away. Her mother died three years ago after a lightning fast decline due to dementia. Her father has been gone four years due to a decade-long battle with Alzheimer’s.

In her new book, Mom’s Gone Missing, When a Parent’s Changing Life Upends Yours, author Susan A. Marshall shares the ups and downs of caring for her parents as each faded away to the ravages of Alzheimer’s and dementia. The Forward of the book is written by former Wisconsin Governor, Martin Schreiber.

She will be share what she’s learned as a family caregiver at a special FREE event December 17, 5-6 p.m. open to the public. The presentation & open discussion is hosted by the Alzheimer’s and Dementia Alliance of Wisconsin.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

RSVP here

Recent Blog Posts & New/Press

Tips for Caregivers (Part Three)

Clinical information is your bedrock. Family members who do not have experience with providers or the understanding of the situation you have gained may dispute you at every turn. This is normal. Their aggression can certainly trigger an emotional response. You’ll lose it at times. Forgive yourself. Get some rest.

Tips for Caregivers (Part Two)

Listen carefully to information provided. Take time to consider it before asking questions that may have already been answered or cannot yet be answered. Remember that providers are fellow humans, subject to all the emotional challenges you are experiencing.

Tips for Caregivers (Part One)

Family members who are not directly involved in caretaking may have strong feelings about what is being done. These feelings can come out as forceful opinions or judgment of your efforts. Recognize that these feelings are normal during times of high stress.

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