The Morning Blend Show on TMJ4-TV Milwaukee

Susan Marshall, founder of Backbone Institute, is the author of the recently released memoir, Mom’s Gone Missing…when a parent’s changing life upends yours ….a poignant story written by Susan about the challenging journey as a caregiver to her father’s decade-long Alzheimer’s journey and a mother’s lightning-fast dementia and both of their deaths. Susan writes about what happens to the family during these challenging times, and how she, as the spokesperson for her family, was on a daily, emotional roller coaster with associated organizations in finance, legal and health. Susan’s book is a powerful inside look when a family member negotiates the myriad, often exhausting details of a healthcare crisis for each parent. This is a book like no other since it is a passionate, inside look at what it’s like to have a loved one ‘missing’ due to a disease with no cure.

We are joined by Susan today to get insight into her experience with a loved one’s mental decline, and how this book can help others struggling with the same thing.

You can grab a copy of Mom’s Gone Missing on Susan’s website SusanAMarshall.com, Barnes and Noble, Amazon.com, or Books & Company in Oconomowoc. Her book will be increasingly available at retail outlets in the coming months. Just in time for the holidays!

Watch the video here.

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Tips for Caregivers (Part Three)

Clinical information is your bedrock. Family members who do not have experience with providers or the understanding of the situation you have gained may dispute you at every turn. This is normal. Their aggression can certainly trigger an emotional response. You’ll lose it at times. Forgive yourself. Get some rest.

Tips for Caregivers (Part Two)

Listen carefully to information provided. Take time to consider it before asking questions that may have already been answered or cannot yet be answered. Remember that providers are fellow humans, subject to all the emotional challenges you are experiencing.

Tips for Caregivers (Part One)

Family members who are not directly involved in caretaking may have strong feelings about what is being done. These feelings can come out as forceful opinions or judgment of your efforts. Recognize that these feelings are normal during times of high stress.

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